Omeprazole linked to liver disease

Omeprazole Linked To Liver Disease Researchers Find

Omeprazole Linked To Liver Disease Researchers find

Omeprazole linked to liver disease a recent study shows. For a while now, they have been discussions about Proton Pump Inhibitors causing long term undesirable side effects. This recent study looks into the increase rate of liver disease year after year and the possible link to the use of Proton Pump Inhibitors.

Proton Pump Inhibitors are among the top 4 most prescribed drug here in the UK (List Here), establishing a link between their use and liver disease raises a major concern to the population. A previous research showed, omeprazole associated with side effects leading to liver problems such as yellow skin, dark pee and tiredness. It happens in less than 1 in 1,000 people taking omeprazole reported on NHS website Here.

The researchers demonstrated that proton pump inhibitors promote progression of alcoholic liver disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in mice by increasing numbers of intestinal Enterococcus spp. Full Study Report Here.
Proton Pump inhibitors suppresses gastric acid secretions which induces overgrowth of intestinal Enterococcus and its translocation to the liver. In the liver, hepatic macrophages and Kupffer cells recognise Enterococcus and induce interleukin-1 beta (IL1B) secretion contributing to ethanol-induced liver inflammation and hepatocyte damage.

Key Points For Healthcare Professionals

1. Inform patients about symptoms to look out for: feeling generally unwell or tired, yellow eyes and skin, swollen abdomen and legs and tarry black stools

2. Patients with pre existing liver disease are significantly more at risk.

3. Clinicians should consider withholding medications that suppress gastric acid unless there is a strong medical indication

4. Before prescribing gastric acid suppressive medication treatment benefit should outweigh the possible risk.

 

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